Archive for the ‘Food’ Category:

How to Cook Mussels at Home–and Why It's Easier Than You Think

"De-bearding." "Purging." "Scrubbing." If you’ve ever read a mussels recipe, you may well have decided that the lingo was too daunting for you to face them at home. The first time I cooked mussels I was straight-up terrified. How was I to store these bivalve mollusks without killing them? And how did I know which ones were dead, so as not to give myself food poisoning? All in all, it seemed much simpler to waltz down to the nearest French bistro—admittedly an easy thing to do here in New York City—and plunk down $12 to $17 for mussels and fries.
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3 Easy Salad Dressing Recipes You Can Make at Home

Salad and I did not get off to a good start. It occupied one of the beige squares on the school cafeteria lunch tray. I was deep in conversation about the things that matter to 6-year-olds—the virtues of Cabbage Patch Kids or whatnot—and was focused on the burger that sat next to the salad, one square over on the tray. I'd promised my parents I’d have two bites of salad before the burger. As I lifted the fork, someone screamed. A live, curious inchworm was millimeters from my open mouth. I wouldn’t get near salad for a full 10 years
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2 Awesome Instant Pot Deals for Anybody Who Missed Out on Amazon Prime Day

Amazon Prime Day 2018 set a record for sales of the popular Instant Pot multi-cooker. The Instant Pot six-quart DUO60 model was on sale for less than $60. It sold out on Amazon in just 19 hours (including four hours when Amazon’s site wasn’t functioning correctly), Instant Pot parent company Double Insight CEO Robert Wang told CNBC this week. The DUO60 is normally $100, so it’s no surprise people leaped at the chance to buy it on Prime Day for just $58.99. But if you missed your chance, we’ve got great news: There’s an Instant Pot flash sale going on
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A Man Died From 'Flesh-Eating' Bacteria After Eating an Oyster. Here's What You Need to Know

[brightcove:3507214781001 default] A 71-year-old man died after eating what many consider a delicacy: raw oysters. The man, whose name has not been released, ate an oyster at a restaurant in Sarasota, Florida that turned out to be contaminated with Vibrio vulnificus bacteria. Said to have been dealing with underlying medical conditions, the man died two days later, USA Today reported. Vibrio bacteria usually cause gastrointestinal symptoms like diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. But people with medicals issues such as liver disease, diabetes, stomach disorders, or other conditions that weaken the body’s typical immune response are at a higher risk of more serious complications or even
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Cycle Touring: The Great Escape

Joshua Cunningham Thursday, July 12, 2018 – 16:04 Joshua Cunningham spent a year cycling from the western tip of Europe to the eastern edge of Asia, dealing with tough routes, changes in climate and baffling local bureaucracy – but a bike adventure can go anywhere and be of any distance. In this extract from his new book, he tells of his extraordinary journey and explains how anyone can have an equally amazing bike experience Adventure cycling, cycle touring, bikepacking, bike travel, bike tripping, bike bivvying… there’s an ever-increasing list of sub-genres that people like to use when talking about travelling
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6 Tips for Cooking Brown Rice Perfectly

Even among those who consider themselves skilled home cooks, rice can present a thorny issue. Once you nail your process, you’re pretty much good for life; I tend to use the first-knuckle strategy for white rice. But recently I’ve swapped out white rice for brown, which has more fiber and slightly more protein. Thinking I could use my usual recipe, I did my typical approach: boiling water and rice together, adding salt, covering it for 12 minutes and cooking it over low heat, then setting it aside, covered, for 12 minutes. The result? Rice that went right into the trash
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6 Tips for Cooking Brown Rice Perfectly

Even among those who consider themselves skilled home cooks, rice can present a thorny issue. Once you nail your process, you’re pretty much good for life; I tend to use the first-knuckle strategy for white rice. But recently I’ve swapped out white rice for brown, which has more fiber and slightly more protein. Thinking I could use my usual recipe, I did my typical approach: boiling water and rice together, adding salt, covering it for 12 minutes and cooking it over low heat, then setting it aside, covered, for 12 minutes. The result? Rice that went right into the trash
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How to Make a Quick Pickle–and Why You Should

A truism among chefs is that often something doesn’t need more salt, it needs more acid—whether that’s a squeeze of lemon or a dash of sherry vinegar. Often, in fact, it needs acid more. The lovely thing with pickles is that they can add color, acid, and salt, all in one fell swoop. Consider the taco: A taco bar set with guacamole, lime quarters, tortillas, protein, and cilantro is great. One with chopped onions is a little better. But one with pickled onions? Now you’re at a restaurant, even if it’s only in your mind. And those pinkish pickled onions
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Are Lower-Calorie Wines Actually Good for You?

“We crush grapes, you crush life.” So goes the slogan for FitVine, a year-old wine company that “was born when friends made a pact to craft amazing wines that also fit their lifestyles. Our team is always on the go, whether we’re doing CrossFit, cycling, running, skiing, paddle boarding, or just enjoying the outdoors.” Then there’s Cense, a lower-than-typical-calorie-count wine “for a well-balanced life,” made in partnership with WeightWatchers. It’s similar to low-calorie SkinnyGirl wines, whose website trumpets, “At just 100 calories per serving, you can give yourself permission to enjoy a palate-pleasing Pinot!” The subtext here? “Wine can be healthy!
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5 Kinds of Food-Shamers You Will Encounter (and How to Deal)

If you've ever had anyone walk in to your cubicle as you were inhaling a Quarter Pounder with Cheese and say, "I didn't know anyone ate fast food anymore," congrats: You've been food shamed. You should know you're in excellent company, as it's happened to Health staffers at previous jobs (see No. 2 and No. 4), Olympic athletes, even celebs like Heidi Klum and Demi Lovato. "Once foods are called 'good' and 'bad,' then the people who are doing the eating are judged good and bad as well," Pamela Peeke, MD, author of The Hunger Fix, told Health. But don't let food
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