Archive for the ‘Food’ Category:

How to Stop Beating Yourself Up About What You Eat

[brightcove:5600354387001 default] Location: My house. Girls’ night. The scene: Cheese plate. Many bottles of wine. And a running commentary from all my friends: “I can’t stop eating this cheese.” “I can’t believe I’m still eating this cheese.” “I’ve been eating so much cheese this week. I’m so gross.” To me: “I’m so sorry I’m eating all your cheese.” And then: “Do you have any more of this cheese?” Of course, it’s not always cheese. Feel free to insert bread, pasta, cookies, chocolate, or chips into that scenario. In this age of clean eating, detox diets, and food phobias, there is
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5 Lower-Calorie Versions of Your Favorite Comfort Foods

[brightcove:5592220247001 default] Now that we're smack in the middle of the longest, coldest stretch of winter, I'm all about eating warm, creamy comfort foods. Honestly, if I had it my way, I'd eat everything covered in melted cheese or butter. But, of course, I know this isn’t the healthiest option, especially because the extra calories and fat will likely pack on the pounds come springtime. Instead of missing out on my favorite seasonal dishes, I satisfy my comfort-food cravings by making healthy swaps in my meals. Here are some lower-calorie versions of my favorite comfort foods.  Toasted Almond Butter & Marmalade
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The Secret to Enjoying Pasta Guilt-Gree

[brightcove:5592220247001 default] Have you cut back on or—gasp!—given up pasta because of the bad rap it’s gotten? (It’s a carb! Carbs make you fat!) Do you miss it? Good news: It's time to put a pot of salted water on to boil. While we tend to think of foods as “good” or “bad,” the reality is almost any food is fine in moderation. Our strategy for worry-free noodle indulgence? Balance your plate with plenty of produce, lean protein, and good fats. RELATED: 14 Slimming Pizza and Pasta Recipes So what’s a reasonable serving size? About 2 ounces of dry pasta per
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11 Health Words You're Saying All Wrong

[brightcove:5592022488001 default] There are few things that cause more self-loathing than fumbling over the pronunciation of something you order everyday—or say when you’re trying to sound smart. Whether you get an açaí smoothie for breakfast, a quinoa bowl for lunch, or have an uncle who recently had angina, here’s how to say it all the right way (and feel a lot less awkward in the process). Açaí Say it right: ah-sigh-EE This antioxidant-packed Amazonian fruit tastes delicious in smoothies or breakfast bowls—and confounds most people trying to order it. RELATED: 23 Superfruits You Need Now! Angina Say it right: AN-juh-nuh Technically it’s
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Which Is Healthier: Fried Shrimp or Fried Catfish?

[brightcove:5590681487001 default] "Fried" is considered the other F-word to anyone trying to eat healthy. But if you're hankering for some retro (read: breaded) summer seafood, you can pick catfish without much regret. "Despite its breading, fried catfish has a low calorie count," says Stephanie Middleberg, RD, founder of Middleberg Nutrition in New York City. "The po'boy, on the other hand, not only has the fried seafood but comes in a crusty baguette, which increases the calorie and carbohydrate totals without whole-grain perks." RELATED: 11 Healthy Fish Recipes Plus, a "dressed" po'boy is topped with lettuce, tomatoes and pickles and slathered
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These Are the Best Slow Cookers

[brightcove:5591984431001 default] This article originally appeared on Food & Wine. Slow cookers are certainly popular—over 80 percent of American households has one. In such a crowded field, it’s tricky to sort out which is the best one to buy, especially when they all seem pretty much identical. I’ve spent the last year doing almost nothing but slow cook, writing a book called Adventures in Slow Cooking, which will be published in October by William Morrow. My apartment looks like Hoarders: Slow Cooker Edition. I’ve learned that there are variables among slow cooker models that make a big difference in both
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This $100 Gadget Is Taking Over Kitchens Everywhere

[brightcove:5591984431001 default] This article originally appeared on Money. Kitchen appliances don’t normally stir up super strong emotions. The Instant Pot, a multitasking pressure cooker that’s become a cult favorite among cooks, is one of the exceptions. [brightcove:5339322755001 default] The six-quart Instant Pot DUO60 7-in-1 Multi-Functional Pressure Cooker ($100) is not only Amazon’s top seller in the Home & Kitchen category, it also has inspired customers to write the most reviews by far of any bestseller: At last check, there were nearly 18,000 reviews, 84% of which were five stars. For the sake of comparison, the highest-rated pressure cooker that’s not
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5 Spaghetti Squash Recipes You Need to Try This Fall

[brightcove:5137293073001 default] If you’ve never made spaghetti squash before, there are two things you should know: It’s easy, and it’s kind of magical. To prep, carefully slice the oblong-shaped veggie in half, lengthwise, and scoop out the seeds. Lightly brush or rub the cut sides with olive oil. Place on a baking sheet, cut side down, and bake at 375 degrees for about 45 minutes. After you take it out of the oven, let it cool a bit. Then, with the cut side facing up, run a fork along the length of the squash from one end to the other.
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You're Eating Fish All Wrong

[brightcove:5590665262001 default] Eating fish has been tied with lower rates of heart disease, stroke, depression, and Alzheimer’s disease. But how it you eat may be the real key to reaping its benefits. Recent research from University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine concluded that study volunteers who regularly ate fish had larger brain volumes in regions associated with memory and cognition, but only if the fish baked or broiled, not fried. Baking and broiling are also better for your waistline. For example, a dozen fried shrimp can pack 280 calories, versus a mere 85 calories for 12 shrimp that have been
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3 Delicious Meals Rich in Brain-Boosting Ingredients

[brightcove:5590665262001 default] Did your mom ever tell you to eat your fish because it’s “brain food”? Turns out that once again, she was right. “Everyone with a brain should know how to feed it,” writes psychiatrist Drew Ramsey, MD, in his new book, Eat Complete ($27, amazon.com), which focuses on 21 nutrients essential to brain health (including of course, omega-3 fatty acids). “There’s one silver bullet in health, and it’s in the shape of a fork,” says Dr. Ramsey. “When people nourish themselves, it really does transform your health. I’ve seen that clinically.” Here, he shares three delicious recipes from
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